Maximise your Mobility – *New Group Program*

ASP_046

– with Accredited Exercise Physiologist Huw Darnell

At Aspire we believe that everyone should be able to move their body to the best of its ability without pain and discomfort. Our modern lifestyles demands us to move less, perform repetitive activities and lose touch with how good our body should feel when we move well.

The ‘Maximise your Mobility’ program blends several mobility concepts and systems to provide a weekly class to help improve your movement capacity, develop a deeper level of body awareness, enhance your recovery and improve your posture and performance.

The Maximise your Mobility program starting on Thursday 26th October at 12.30pm will run for 1 hour per week for a 6-week period. The program will involve aspects of self-myofascial release, mobility, body control and mindfulness

Is this program right for me?

The human body should be able to achieve and perform in many different positions and environments. Some key positions that we believe are important for overall joint health and athletic performance are listed below.

Each of these 5 movements contain an easy to perform assessment that you can check off at home and identify some areas for movement improvement that the Maximise your Mobility class can help you with.

If you have trouble achieving one or more of these movements pain free, then your mobility or performance may be suffering. If you have to STOP for any of the reasons listed in the direction or you suffer pain from the movement you have not achieved the movement successfully. 

SELF-ASSESSMENT

1.  The Deep Squat – The deep squat encompasses a multi-joint lower body movement that requires us to express full ROM at the ankle, knees, hips and spine to achieve an ideal body position. This is a movement that almost all children can perform easily. However, as we age and we spend less time in a deep squat, alter our daily habits and spend extended periods of time in poor postures we generally lose the ability to do so.

DIRECTION:  Stand with your feet just outside shoulder width apart. Squat down as low as you can while you maintain a neutral/flat spine. STOP if your knees cave inside the line of your feet, your heels lift off the ground, your chest drops down or if you lose balance.

The first picture below is correct positioning, the second is incorrect.

Deep Squat - GoodDeep Squat - Bad

2.  Toe Touch and Hip Hinge – being able to bend over and touch your toes pain free is a movement everyone should possess (with a few exceptions). Being able to move freely through your hips and achieve 80-90 degrees of hip flexion (i.e. touch your toes) is also very important for any activity that mimics this (especially loaded) e.g. deadlifting or lifting heavy objects from the floor. If an individual cannot achieve this through pure hip flexion the body may then flex through the lumbar spine and overload this area and potentially increase the risk of injury.

DIRECTION TOE TOUCH: Start by standing with feet shoulder width part, squeeze your quads so that your knees stay locked out. Bend at the waist toward the floor and see if you can get your palms flat on the ground. STOP when you cannot keep your knees straight or the tension in the back of your legs stop you.

The first picture below is correct positioning, the second is incorrect.

Toe Touch - Good Toe Touch - Bad

DIRECTION HIP HINGE: Repeat the same as above only this time stand with slightly bent knees and keep your back straight as you lean forward form the hips (like a hinge rotating at the hips). STOP when you cannot maintain a neutral/flat back.

The first picture below is correct positioning, the second is incorrect.

Hip Hinge - GoodHip Hinge - Bad

3.   Lunge – no movement screen would be complete without including some sort of single leg component because most movements in everyday life require us to be able to move well and produce force from one leg. This movement also gives us insight into someone’s ability to maintain an extended hip while moving through range, think running – if someone lacks the ability achieve full hip extension they may transfer the load up stream towards another joint (e.g. their low back) and overload this area of the body.

DIRECTION:  To get into the start position in the lunge, stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Then step back with your right leg the length of your shin. As you lower your back knee towards the floor see if you can keep your glute squeezed on the back leg and your front foot flat on the floor. Repeat stepping back with left leg. STOP if your front heel comes off the ground, your knee tracks inside the line of your foot and/or you cannot maintain tension in your glute.

The first picture below is correct positioning side on view, the second is incorrect side on view. The third is correct positioning from a front on view and lastly incorrect positioning front on view.

Lunge - GoodLunge - Bad

Lunge Front - GoodLunge Front - Bad

 

4.  Wall Shoulder Flexion (Overhead position) – can you get your arms overhead without any compensation at other joints throughout the body e.g. over-arching your low back to get your hands up over your head? This is a very common dysfunctional movement pattern that people present with. You may think this isn’t important, however if you perform any strength work or repetitive activity above head, e.g. chin ups, overhead activities at home, swimming, throwing etc it is important to be able to achieve this position.

DIRECTION:  To get into the starting position stand with your feet about 1 foot length away from the wall, keep your low back pressed flat onto the wall (keep it here throughout movement) and do not let your head move away from the wall. Raise both arms and try to reach the wall with your hands. STOP if you compensate by arching your low back off the wall, bend your elbows or your head moves off the wall.

The first picture below is correct positioning, the second is incorrect.

Overhead - GoodOverhead - Bad

5.  Press Position – if someone lacks the ability to achieve full shoulder extension (lifting your arms behind your body) and regularly goes into this position they may end up injuring the shoulder or neck. This may seem insignificant but if you are rowing, doing push-ups, or a bench press without a properly functioning shoulder you may end up with shoulder injury or pain.

DIRECTION: To set up lay down on the floor in a push up position i.e. with your chest touching the ground and your palms flat on the floor in line with bottom of your chest. Move your forearm into a vertical position and see if you can maintain a flat or slightly posteriorly tilted shoulder blade (Think about the wings of the plane on takeoff e.g. facing the sky).

The first picture below is correct positioning, the second is incorrect.

Press - GoodPress - Bad

If you had trouble achieving one or more of these movements, it may be time for our ‘Maximise your Mobility’ program! To register for this 6 week program contact our friendly reception team by emailing reception@aspirefitnessrehab.com.au or call (07) 3310 4969.

Hydration Matters

 

ASP_006

Our body is made up of 60% water (can be up to 78% depending on age) water.

It is crucial for survival so it is important to be aware of our body’s need for hydration. Our body needs water for the following functions:

  •    It transports materials throughout the body
  •    It eliminates toxins and waste products
  •    It acts as solvents for nutrients
  •    It regulates body temperature
  •    It is used for energy product in
  •    It aids in digestion and absorption

Every system in the entire body depends on water and requires hydration!

It is recommended that the average individual take in at least 3L of water a day…that figure is raised to 4L during hot days or in hot climates.

Sports and Hydration

Caffeinated beverages, such as soft drinks, coffee and tea act as diuretics and can increase urination that can lead to dehydration. It’s important therefore to consult your Sports Dietician if using caffeine pre-event to ensure you are getting the stimulant vs hydration balance right.

What happens during exercise?

Heat is generated as a by-product of your working muscles. As body heat rises, body temperature and heart rate also rise. As the exercise continues, the body is limited in transferring heat from the muscles to the skin surface. The body will require hydration.

Exercising in hot, dry climates presents additional risks to dehydration. Body fluids will evaporate rapidly so that you may not notice any symptoms. In humid climates, when moisture increases, sweat decreases. When your sweating rate decreases, your body temperature rises and you will fatigue more easily and your risk of heat injury is greater.

What is heat injury?

Heat injuries include heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.

  •    Heat cramps are severe muscle spasms resulting from heavy sweating.
  •    Heat exhaustion is severe fatigue resulting from excessive exposure to heat that can lead to collapse.
  •    Heat stroke is a life threatening condition that develops rapidly and may not have any warning signs. It is the third leading cause of death among athletes.

There are three factors that contribute to heat injuries. They are –

  •    Increased body temperature
  •    Loss of body fluids
  •    Loss of electrolytes

Symptoms to look for include –

  •    Weakness
  •    Chills
  •    Goose pimples on your chest and upper arms
  •    Nausea
  •    Headache faintness
  •    Disorientation
  •    Muscle cramping
  •    Cessation of sweating

To reduce the risk of heat injuries, adequate fluid replacement is essential before, during and after exercise.

What fluid is best for rehydration?

Water is the appropriate drink before, during and after exercise. However, for exercise lasting longer than one hour and after exercise, it is important to replace electrolytes lost. Sodium replacement not only maintains blood concentration but also increases palatability, and therefore the desire to drink.

The addition of carbohydrates will delay the onset of fatigue and help to maintain blood glucose concentration. A sport drink with 4%-8% carbohydrate is recommended for replacement during exercise, especially with exercise bouts lasting longer than one hour.

So the next time you exercise, remember the importance of hydration. It is a simple step that can save your life!

Exercise for people living with Diabetes

ASP_038

Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease characterised by deficiency of insulin leading to hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar levels). Insulin insufficiency reduces the body’s ability to use glucose as fuel and transport to muscles, therefore it accumulates in blood. Research has shown that even light to moderate resistance training can have a large impact upon blood glucose control for people living with Type 2 diabetes. It promotes uptake of the glucose from the blood to be utilised by exercising muscles, having a similar physiological effect on the body as insulin. These benefits not only last for the duration of exercise, but for several hours afterwards. Therefore, regular physical activity is encouraged to help people living with Type 2 diabetes reduce their blood glucose levels with less reliance upon medication. Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus generally includes a combination of regular exercise and healthy eating.

So what are some of the benefits?

  • Prevention of diabetes related complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, fatty liver, heart/blood vessel)
  • Improved cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Increased strength
  • Improved oxygen delivery
  • Reduction in blood pressure
  • Reduction in blood glucose
  • Improved insulin sensitivity
  • Weight loss
  • Improve blood lipid profile
  • Increase muscle hypertrophy and capilerisation to improve circulation (as people living with diabetes may tend to have poor blood flow).
  • Whilst exercise cannot rectify Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus cell damage, it can:
  • Affect the response of muscles to insulin and blood glucose level post exercise
  • Affect how glucose is processed back to muscles irrespective of insulin levels and
  • Deliver a lower dose response of insulin needed by improving the body’s response to insulin.

People living with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with minimal diabetic complications, can take on most types of physical activity and exercise (with medical clearance).

How to get started:

  • See your GP and get a clearance to exercise
  • Ask your GP about the best time of the day for you to exercise and any other medical considerations specific to you that you will need to pass on to your exercise professional
  • Ask your GP about Medicare’s Chronic Disease Management Plan program – this can assist you with meeting some of the costs associated with getting an exercise program underway
  • Get some supportive shoes and well-fitting socks to prevent foot ulcers:  Regular foot checks are also recommended
  • Consult an Accredited Exercise Physiologist to expertly prescribe a program for you specifically, that will address your personal health needs.

Our Accredited Exercise Physiologists design tailored, individual exercise intervention programs to help those living with diabetes increase their physical activity levels and promote adherence to exercise in a supportive environment. The aim is to provide a structured and safe atmosphere for the completion of resistance and aerobic exercise to keep people living with diabetes healthy.

To make an appointment with one of our Exercise Physiology team to discuss our diabetes and exercise programs and if they are right for you, feel free to book online, email reception@aspirefitnessrehab.com.au or call 07 3310 4969

Rugby Strength and Conditioning

Specialised and Individualised is best

Having been the Strength and Conditioning Coach for UQ Rugby for the past 5 years, Accredited Exercise Physiologist Adam Garred is no stranger to the finer points of formulating and delivering successful programs for Rugby athletes. ‘Rugby is a high intensity impact sport, requiring a balance of strength, power, speed, and agility to absorb contact forces. It is vital that players have a sport specific strength and conditioning program that progressively develops these qualities, as this is paramount in the development of rugby players at any level’ advised Adam.

Adam also noted that a specific S&C program can also help the rugby athlete reach their developmental goals such as increased lean muscle mass or reducing skinfolds, all while providing strength training to avoid potential injuries and aid in recovery.

Aspire Fitness and Rehabilitation programs provide a professional and structured training environment to develop rugby specific physiological qualities. The programs have a major emphasis on developing core lifts and efficient movement mechanics. Specific structures such as the neck, shoulder girdle, core/hips, knee and ankle are targeted. Strategies are implemented and aimed at strength and stability of the musculoskeletal system, in order to prevent rugby related injuries.

To book an appointment with Adam, or one of our Accredited Exercise Physiologists contact our friendly reception team by email reception@aspirefitnessrehab.com.au or calling 07 3310 4969. We also now take bookings online. 

ASP_025_Cropped

Exercise more effective than medication in treating cancer fatigue

ASP_029

Recent research released and published in ‘JAMA Oncology’ studied four most commonly recommended treatments for cancer-related-fatigue; exercise, psychological, the combination of exercise and psychological, and pharmaceutical.

The results found that exercise (in combination with psychological treatments) reduces cancer-related fatigue during and after cancer treatment. In contrast, pharmaceutical interventions do not improve cancer-related fatigue to the same extent, and clinicians should prescribe exercise as a first-line treatment for cancer-related fatigue. This research puts exercise at the forefront of patient management in relation to cancer related fatigue as opposed to standard pharmacological pathways.

Exercising during chemotherapy can help ease side effects, such as fatigue and nausea, and can help to boost the immune system of those undergoing cancer treatments. Chemotherapy side effects can sometimes make exercising tough, but it’s recommended to try to be as active as possible during treatment. It is essential for exercise programs to be individualised to your treatment status, functional capacity, physical limitations, exercise history and preferences. Accredited Exercise Physiologists can play an integral role in any patient’s recovery.

To make an appointment with one of our Accredited Exercise Physiology team to discuss cancer and exercise program options, and if they are right for you, feel free to book online, email reception@aspirefitnessrehab.com.au or call 07 3310 4969

ASP_026ASP_016

Thoracic Mobility

 

Artboard 2

Why Do You Need Thoracic Mobility?
Lack of thoracic mobility forces your body to function in ways it was not designed for. Lack of thoracic mobility also forces your lower back and/or neck and shoulders to compensate. These can increase the risk of injury.

Do You Lack Thoracic Mobility?
Lie with your back on the floor. Place your feet and buttocks flat on the floor. Bring your arms straight overhead (not the side). Keep your elbows locked and don’t hyper-extend your lower back. If you can’t touch the floor with your wrists, you lack thoracic mobility. You can improve it using the recommended exercises.

To assist, try maintaining a good posture by doing the following:

  • Keep your head erect.
  • Lift your chest up from the sternum.
  • Activate the muscles between your shoulder blades, and then release- the trick to this is practice many times a day.
  • Look after your posture at the office; have a good chair with a firm back support.
  • Maintain good posture at the gym. Keeping your chest up on Squats & Deadlifts prevents lower back rounding.  Improving thoracic mobility makes it easier to keep your chest up.

Also, try some of the following exercises and perform them a few times a day:

  1. Shoulder StretchRelease the shoulder blades as you sit or stand, by taking your clasped hands behind your back, extending your head back at the same time. Hold 20 seconds, repeat 5 times.
  2. Back ArchLie face down. Lift your shoulders by drawing your shoulder blades together, hold for 10 seconds, and then relax. Repeat 10 times.
  3. Cobra Stretch with rotation Lie face down. Lift from the waist, and rotate your upper trunk from side to side so that you feel a tight stretch in your back. 10 rotations each way.
  4. Broom – handle stretch & swing – Place a long rod, such as a broom handle, behind your neck, grasp it as shown and rotate your body from side to side, reaching maximum stretch. Perform 10 rotations each way.
  5. Thoracic Foam Roller – Lie back on the floor. Put the foam roller under your thoracic spine. Hug yourself so your shoulder blades shift to the side or stretch your arms above your head. Place your feet and buttocks flat on the floor. Roll back & forth. Stay away from your neck and lower back. Continue for 5 minutes, but take a break when needed. Your goal is to “arch” your thoracic spine. Try to wrap your upper-back around the foam roller. You alternatively can use two tennis balls in a sock, or taped together. Stay away from your lower back & neck.

Thoracic Foam Roller

To make an appointment with one of our Exercise Physiology team to discuss your thoracic mobility book online, email reception@aspirefitnessrehab.com.au or call 07 3310 4969

5 Simple Tips to Improve Your Sleep

Lack of Sleep & Sports Injuries

Huw Darnell – Accredited Exercise Physiologist AFR

The importance of sleep for optimal human function and sporting performance has been well established, however it is often an area of performance athletes execute poorly. In a recent study Milewski et al 2014, explored the effects of chronic lack of sleep and it’s effect on sports injuries.

They were able to show over a 21 month period that athletes who experience a chronic lack of sleep, i.e. getting less than 8 hours on average per night have were shown to increase their chance of injury by 1.7 times compared to those who get 8 hours or more.

Lack of sleep also manifests itself into decrease central nervous system and cognitive performance, affecting memory and motor learning, it decreases the immune systems defenses, which increases susceptibility to illness and infection, it decreases muscle glycogen resynthesis and therefore can effect energy stores and finally it can affect muscle recovery by decreasing protein synthesis.

Sleep #1_cr

Whether you are an athlete or not you should aim to get 8 hours of sleep per night. Below is pre-bed checklist that can help to maximize your sleep:

  • Have a bed time routine: warm shower, brush teeth, regular sleep and wake time and don’t view bright computers, phones or TV’s within 30 minutes of going to bed as it can disrupt your sleep.
  • Perform high intensity intense training earlier in the day if possible
  • Get your night time nutrition right: don’t consume stimulants from midday onwards e.g. gym pre-workout, coffee, caffeinated teas, avoid eating heavy meals for dinner and avoid consuming large quantities of fluid or any alcohol in the evening.
  • Have sleep friendly bedroom: have a comfy bed that for sleeping only, this means no phones or computers in bed. Your bedroom should also be as dark, quiet and cool as possible
  • Relax, don’t stress: abdominal breathing, visualisation and progressive muscle relaxation are advanced techniques that can be used to help relax the mind and the body before bed. I also find performing a brain dump, where you write all your thoughts down on a clear sheet of paper can help keep a clear mind for bed.

 

1. Picture from Yann Le Meur http://ylmsportscience.blogspot.com.au
2. Milewski et al (2014). Chronic Lack of Sleep is Associated with Increased Sports Injuries in Adolescent Athletes. Journal Pediatric Orthopaedics, 34 (2):129-133.

Muscle up for MND is Back!

Muscle-up-for-MND---LED-screen-2015 (1)-1

Get ready to have the most fun you have had while exercising!

• Support 300 terminally ill Queenslanders
• Break a world record

Aspire Fitness & Rehabilitation and Queensland Sports Medicine Centre are again proudly supporting the MND and Me Foundation by entering a Team into the “Muscle Up for MND” event supporting Queenslanders living with Motor Neurone Disease (MND). Just like last year the aim is to invade the Gabba in an attempt to break the World Record for the Largest Personal Training Circuit Class.

The current World Record is 2061 people, held by Guy Leech.

On Saturday 7 March 2015 you get the chance to:

• Be a sporting superstar by running out on to the world-famous Gabba for a training session
• Rub shoulders with some of Australia’s elite athletes while training
• Brag that you are a world record holder

Of course by participating we also get the chance to show our support for Queenslanders impacted by this terminal and debilitating disease.

THE WORLD RECORD ATTEMPT

During the one hour session (8.45am – 9.45am) we will rotate together through 10 different stations set up around the ground – including an AFR & QSMC boxing station. Exercises at each station will go for 4 minutes in duration and cater for different fitness levels allowing everyone to Muscle Up. To participate all that is asked is that you donate your regular training fee (or a minimum of $20). All donations over $2 are tax deductible.

This is a great opportunity for us to come together have some fun, while helping a very worthy cause. When you register you will be asked join a team – just select AFR & QSMC.

To register and for more information click here

Get Moving Exercise Project

Queensland Sports Medicine Centre (QSMC) and Aspire Fitness & Rehabilitation (AFR) are excited to announce the launch of the ‘Get Moving’ Medical Exercise Program DVD to assist people with dementia. The Get Moving program has been designed and facilitated by the Accredited Exercise Physiology Team at AFR in conjunction with Alzheimer’s Australia (Qld). Following the success of the supervised Brisbane based program over the past 18 months the program has now been expanded to produce a take-home DVD of the program. This is to allow people with dementia and their carers across Australia to undertake the program in the comfort of their own home.

This evidence-based program is designed to facilitate and empower clients to achieve a return to functional independence and an improved quality of life.

Benefits of the program to date have shown:

• Improved strength and mobility,
• Improved mood and general wellness,
• Improved flexibility & balance and
• Improved ability to perform everyday tasks like walking and standing.
Accredited Exercise Physiologist Molly Shevill from AFR stated ‘It has been such an amazing program to be involved with for the last 18 months. It is hoped that the production of this DVD will create an avenue for remote and interstate AAQ clients & their carers to take on the program and experience the benefits of exercise that have been observed with the Brisbane based clients to date”.

To register for the Brisbane based supervised sessions of the “Get Moving“ program or to request a copy of the ‘Get Moving’ DVD contact at Alzheimer’s Australia (Qld) on 1800 100 500.

 

MUSCLE UP FOR MND

QUEENSLAND SPORTS MEDICINE CENTRE AND ASPIRE FITNESS AND REHABILITATION ARE GOING TO “MUSCLE UP FOR MND”!

Please come and help us break the World Record for the Largest Personal Training Circuit Class and support 300 terminally ill Queenslanders!

QSMC and AFR are supporting the “MND and Me Foundation” by sponsoring an exercise station and entering a team into the “Muscle Up for MND” event to assist Queenslanders living with Motor Neurone Disease (MND). 

The aim is on Saturday 15 March for 3,000 people to invade the Gabba in an attempt to break the World Record. The current World Record is 2061 people, held by Guy Leech and we hope to smash it!

This is more than an event, it is an experience! How often do you get the chance to:

  • Be a sporting superstar by running out on to the world-famous Gabba for a training   session
  • Rub shoulders with some of Australia’s elite athletes while training
  • Brag that you are a world record holder

 

Of course by participating we also get the chance to show our support for Queenslanders impacted by this terminal and debilitating disease.

The World Record Attempt

During the one hour session (9.00am – 10.00am) we will rotate together through different stations set up around the ground. Exercises at each station will go for 4 minutes in duration and cater for different fitness levels allowing everyone to Muscle Up. To participate all that is asked is that you donate your regular training fee (or a minimum of $20). All donations are tax deductable.

This is a great opportunity for us to have some fun, while helping a very worthy cause.  For more information about MND and the MND and Me Foundation check out this link.

When you register you will be asked the name of the group you are associated with.  Please enter Aspire Fitness & Rehabilitation.

To register and for more information please visit: www.muscleupformnd.com.au

Yours in Fitness

Queensland Sports Medicine Centre & Aspire Fitness & Rehabilitation

What is Motor Neurone Disease?

MND is a terminal condition where the motor neurone nerve cells that control your voluntary muscles progressively die.  It leads to the paralysis of limbs and the ability to speak, swallow and breathe. The mind and the senses usually remain intact. The disease is rapid and debilitating.

The latest MND statistics are out and it is not good.

In 2011 there were 790 MND related deaths in Australia.

  • One death every 11 hours
  • One new diagnosis every 11 hours
  • Average life expectancy 27 months
  • 90% of cases completely random
  •  A cure is yet to be found
  • An effective treatment is yet to be found
  • It can strike anyone at anytime

 

The MND and Me Foundation was formed in January 2011 to raise awareness of MND and its impact on the community. MND and Me Foundation saw the desperate need to assist people living with MND and their families to maintain their independence and quality of life for as long as possible. The Foundation contributes financially toward research into finding a cure, but until one is found, the major objectives are to ensure those who have to live with this terrible disease and their families are supported by the Foundation both in financial and non-financial ways.

The MND and Me vision is to create a quality of life for people living with MND which is not compromised by their diagnosis – a life with dignity and independence.

In 2010, Scott Sullivan was told he had Motor Neurone Disease and his life expectancy was just 3-5 years. In spite of this tragic news his first thoughts were not only for his beautiful wife Sarah and his two children, but for other people living with MND. He was instrumental in creating the MND and Me Foundation.

Scott’s courage and drive to help others despite his illness is an inspiration to us all.

For more information on the MND and Me Foundation please visit www.mndandme.com.au

For further details feel free to contact Paul Olds on 0411 984 137 or admin@mndandme.com.au